Centuries-old history, spectacular landscape, and one-of-a-kind culture – Japan is an amazing destination for so many reasons. But for foodies, the Japanese cuisine alone is reason enough to visit. With an endless variety of regional and seasonal dishes as well as international cuisine, Japan is definitely a paradise for any food enthusiast. From intricate haute cuisine at a luxury ryokan to down-to-earth street food, the country offers a wide range of gastronomical delights.

Tiếng Việt

The first time that I have learned about Japanese cuisine was through mangas published in the 90s like Doraemon and Esper Mami (both are the works of the famous Fujiko Fujio). In these comics, the main characters are often seen consuming typical Japanese dishes such as ramen, katsukare or tonkatsuEven the multi-course kaiseki was also mentioned on several pages. These days, it’s easy to find an establishment specialising in Japanese food in almost every major city across the globe. But nothing can surpass the experience of enjoying kaiseki in a real ryokan or lining for a delicious snack at a yatai when the night falls.

Despite increasing popularity around the world, authentic Japanese cuisine is still surprisingly little understood. It’s more than just sushi, miso or ramen, but rather a sophisticated collection of seasonal and regional dishes, as well as international cuisine. That’s why “A Culinary Journey to Japan” was created to bring my readers closers to a new foodie destination which has begun eclipsing the traditional ones such as France and Italy. First, let us start with some typical dishes that are often seen on the dining table of many Japanese.

1. Ramen

Consisting of wheat noodles, meat-based broth, with sliced pork, dried seaweed and spring onion as toppings, ramen is a favourite comfort food of many Japanese (and foreigners alike). This dish is supposedly originated in China and made its way to Japan in the second half of the 19th century. Depending on the region, the ramen noodles might be thick or thin, straight or wrinkled, or even ribbon-like. The broth, toppings also vary greatly between region, and nearly every establishment in Japan has its own variation of ramen.

The fire ramen
The fire ramen in Kyoto

Tips:

While there are countless good ramen bars in Japan, I found the Fire Ramen in Kyoto is a very special one. Everything is prepared in your bowl before the fiery hot broth was poured on it (literally, the broth was burnt before my eyes). Thanks to the high flame all the excessive fat are seemingly burnt away, and thus the greasy aftertaste is removed.

Address: 757-2 Minamiseyacho, Kamigyo Ward, Kyoto. A 5-minute walk from the northern side of Nijo Castle.

2. Takoyaki

A harmony of octopus and dashi soup, takoyaki is the soul food of Osaka. Invented in the capital of the Kansai region, this addictive snack later spread to other regions. These days you can find takoyaki nearly everywhere in Japan, but it is believed that the one in Osaka is the most aromatic and the tastiest. Nearly 600 establishments in the city are specialised in this dish and you can find them in and around the never-sleeping Namba.

Osaka-6
Takoyaki (fried octopus) is a must-have when visiting Minami

Takoyaki is made of diced octopus stuffed inside a ball-shaped dough. The dough is typically wheat flour mixed with eggs and flavoured with dashi soup – a fish stock that often used in Japanese cuisine. Afterwards, the whole mixture is cooked in a special moulded pan until the takoyaki has a golden brown colour. Unlike in other regions where ingredients such as green onions, dried bonito or seaweed are added, the takoyaki in Osaka is served plain or with a simple soy sauce topping. In this way, guests can enjoy the flavour of the octopus, as well as the pleasant aroma of dashi. Osakans also love their takoyaki salted, which enhances the taste of the ingredients.

3. Tonkatsu & Katsukare

Another simple dish that’s often seen on the dinner table of many Japanese is tonkatsu – deep-fried pork cutlets. Made its first appearance in 1899 at a Tokyo restaurant, tonkatsu is considered as the Japanese version of the Wiener Schnitzel, in which the meat (mostly fillet and loin) is pounded and covered in breadcrumbs before deep frying. But unlike its European counterpart, the tonkatsu is smaller and often served together with plain rice, shredded cabbage and mustard or other special sauces.

Tonkatsu
Tonkatsu with plain rice and shredded cabbage
Katsudon Hozenjiyokocho
Katsudon Hozenjiyokocho – A small restaurant in Osaka Namba specialising in tonkatsu

Tonkatsu is also the main component of katsukare – the Japanese-style curry. Since its introduction to Japan during the Meiji Period (1868-1912), the dish is so widely consumed that some might refer to it as a national dish. However, unlike the Indian curry which is strong in odour and flavour, the Japanese curry has been adapted to the local’s taste bud. It has a milder taste and made mostly of vegetables and meats. Only some curry powder was added in the soup as the final touch, giving the dish a pleasant aroma.

Katsukare
Katsukare – The Japanese-style curry

Tips:

Tucked in an alley in Dotonbori, Katsudon Hozenjiyokocho is the place to go if you want some delicious tonkatsu. The restaurant is small and can only offer seats for 8-10 persons at a time, but it seems popular among locals.

Address: 1 Chome-1-1-17 Nanba, Chūō-ku, Ōsaka-shi, Ōsaka-fu 542-0076

For the katsukare, Koji Labo near Namba station (exit direction Osaka Takashimaya) is highly recommended. Similar to Katsudon Hozenjiyokocho, the establishment is small and coins are needed to pay for your “meal ticket”.

Address: Nanbasennichimae, 14, Chūō-ku, Ōsaka-shi, Ōsaka-fu 542-0075

4. Yakitori

A popular comfort food that served in many yatai (street food vendor) and izakaya (pub restaurant) across Japan, yakitori is the Japanese-styled skewered meat. Designed for portability, the meat is skewed with kushi () – a type of skewer typically made of bamboo or similar materials before being grilled over a charcoal fire. While beef, pork and chicken; including skin and innards, are primary ingredients, grilled vegetable such as mushrooms or scallions is also served. Yakitori is often seasoned with salt, pepper, wasabi, as well as tare – a thickened sauce consisting of mirin, sake, soy sauce and sugar.

Yakitori
Yakitori – Skewered grilled meat
An izakaya
Yakitori-ya – A small restaurant that specialised in yakitori

Tips:

Due to its ease of preparation, it’s no difficult to find an establishment that sells yakitori across Japan. But if you love skewered grilled meat as much as I do, you should consider visiting a yakitori-ya – small restaurant that specialised in yakitori. A good address is Kurashiki Takadaya, 11-36 本町 Kurashiki, Okayama Prefecture.


Hành trình ẩm thực Nhật Bản – Phần 1: Những món ăn thường nhật

Với cảnh sắc thiên nhiên tuyệt đẹp, lịch sử lâu đời và một nền văn hóa vô cùng độc đáo, thật không khó để hiểu tại sao Nhật Bản lại là một điểm đến hấp dẫn đến như vậy. Nhưng đối với không ít du khách, ẩm thực Nhật mới là lí do chính khiến họ đến đây. Mặc dù ngày nay, bạn có thể dễ dàng tìm thấy những quán ăn Nhật ở gần như tất cả các đô thị lớn trên thế giới. Nhưng những trải nghiệm đó khó có thể sánh bằng việc dùng một bữa kaiseki thịnh soạn trong một ryokan đích thực, hay là xếp hàng để có một chỗ trong một izakaya nổi tiếng.

Tuy là món ăn Nhật đã phổ biến rộng rãi trên toàn thế giới, hiểu biết chính xác về các món ăn này vẫn còn khá hạn chế. Nhiều người cho rằng món Nhật chỉ bao gồm hải sản, sushi, súp miso hay ramen. Nhưng trên thực tế ẩm thực Nhật Bản vô cùng phong phú, với vô vàn các món đặc sản vùng miền, thay đổi theo mùa. Thêm vào đó là sự hòa trộn với những nền ẩm thực khác trong khu vực châu Á như Trung Quốc, Hàn Quốc hay Ấn Độ, và kể cả các nền ẩm thực phương Tây như Pháp, Ý. Do đó, “Hành trình ẩm thực Nhật Bản” đã được tạo ra để đem độc giả đến gần hơn với ẩm thực Nhật. Trong post này, một số món ăn thông dụng, thường xuất hiện trên bàn ăn của người Nhật sẽ được giới thiệu.

1. Ramen

Cùng với udon, ramen là một trong những món mì kinh điển ở Nhật Bản. Xuất xứ từ Trung Quốc, ramen du nhập vào Nhật Bản vào khoảng nửa sau thế kỉ 19 và nhanh chóng trở thành thức ăn yêu thích của nhiều người. Mì ramen thường bao gồm sợi mì, nước dùng (thường được nấu từ xương heo), chasu (thịt heo hầm, xắt lát), hành lá và rong biển. Tùy thuộc vào vùng miền mà hình dáng của sợi mì cũng thay đổi theo. Sợi mì có thể mảnh hoặc rộng bản, cũng có thể thẳng hoặc xoắn lại như mì gói. Nước dùng và đồ ăn kèm cũng thay đổi theo từng vùng và nhìn chung thì mỗi quán mì ramen đều có một phiên bản đặc biệt của món mì thông dụng này.

The fire ramen
The fire ramen in Kyoto

Tips:

Có lẽ phải có đến hàng trăm hay hàng nghìn quán mì ngon ở Nhật, nhưng Fire Ramen ở Kyoto là một quán khá đặc biệt. Vật liệu được chuẩn bị trước trong tô trước khi bếp chính đổ một thứ nước dùng bốc lửa vào để nấu chín mọi thứ. Ngọn lửa lớn dường như đã thiêu cháy toàn bộ mỡ thừa trong nước dùng, khiến ta không cảm thấy vị ngấy của mỡ khi ăn.

Địa chỉ: 757-2 Minamiseyacho, Kamigyo Ward, Kyoto. Khoảng 5-7 phút đi bộ từ mặt phía Bắc của cung điện Nijo.

2. Takoyaki

Một sự kết hợp hài hòa giữa bạch tuộc và nước súp dashi, takoyaki là món ăn tinh thần của vùng Kansai. Takoyaki được phát minh trong một quán nhỏ ở Osaka và không lâu sau đó loại snack ngon lành này nhanh chóng lan rộng ra khắp cả nước. Ngày nay, bạn có thể tìm thấy món này ở khắp nơi nhưng người ta nói rằng takoyaki ngon và thơm nhất là ở nơi nó được phát minh – thành phố Osaka. Có đến gần 600 quán bán takoyaki tại thủ phủ của tỉnh Kansai và chúng phần lớn đều tập trung xung quanh khu Namba sầm uất.

Osaka-6
Takoyaki (fried octopus) is a must-have when visiting Minami

Takoyaki được làm từ bạch tuộc xắt nhỏ, được dồn vào trong những viên bột. Những viên bột này thường được làm từ bột mì, trộn với súp dashi – một loại nước dùng đặc biệt làm từ cá. Sau đó, hỗn hợp được nướng chín và đảo đều trên một loại khuôn tròn cho đến khi viên bạch tuộc có màu vàng nâu. Ở các vùng khác, takoyaki thường được bán kèm với bonito hay rong biển, và thường được rưới nước sốt đặc. Nhưng tại Osaka, takoyaki được bán không kèm gì cả, có nơi chỉ rắc ít muối hay rưới nước tương. Bằng cách này, khách có thể thưởng thức vị ngon của mực, đồng thời có thể cảm nhận vị ngọt của súp dashi trong vỏ viên takoyaki.

3. Tonkatsu & Katsukare

Một món ăn đơn giản khác, cũng hay xuất hiện trên bàn ăn của người Nhật là món tonkatsu – thịt cutlet chiên xù. Xuất hiện lần đầu vào năm 1889 tại một nhà hàng ở Tokyo, tonkatsu được xem như phiên bản Nhật của món Wiener Schnitzel nổi tiếng của Áo. Thịt cutlet được đập mềm rồi bọc trong vụn bánh mì, trước khi được chiên xù trong dầu nóng. Nhưng khác với Wiener Schnitzel, tonkatsu thường nhỏ hơn và được phục vụ kèm với cơm trắng, cải bắp xắt nhỏ và sốt mustard hay một loại sốt đặc biệt khác.

Tonkatsu
Tonkatsu with plain rice and shredded cabbage
Katsudon Hozenjiyokocho
Katsudon Hozenjiyokocho – A small restaurant in Osaka Namba specialising in tonkatsu and katsudon

Tonkatsu cũng là một thành phần quan trọng trong món cà-ri Nhật Bản hay còn gọi là katsukare. Từ khi cà-ri được truyền bá đến Nhật Bản vào thời kì Meiji (1868-1912), katsukare đã trở nên rất thịnh hành. Nó được ăn nhiều đến nỗi nhiều người còn xem nó như là một món ăn thuần Nhật. Khác với cà-ri truyền thống của Ấn Độ có mùi hăng và vị khá nồng, cà-ri Nhật có vị nhẹ nhàng nên dễ ăn hơn. Nước cà-ri được nấu chủ yếu từ rau củ và các loại thịt. Bột cà-ri chỉ được thêm vào sau cùng, nhằm tạo mùi hương cho món ăn.

Katsukare
Katsukare – The Japanese-style curry

Tips

Nằm trong một con hẻm nhỏ ở Dotonbori, Katsudon Hozenjiyokocho là một địa điểm lí tưởng ở Osaka để thử món tonkatsu. Quán khá nhỏ, chỉ có từ 8-10 ghế, nhưng khá là nổi tiếng với dân địa phương.

Địa chỉ: 1 Chome-1-1-17 Nanba, Chūō-ku, Ōsaka-shi, Ōsaka-fu 542-0076

Đối với món katsukare, Koji Labo gần trạm Osaka Namba (đi về hướng Takashimaya Osaka) là một quán đáng để ghé qua. Cũng giống như  Katsudon Hozenjiyokocho, quán khá là nhỏ và bạn cần xu lẻ để mua vé ăn.

Địa chỉ: Nanbasennichimae, 14, Chūō-ku, Ōsaka-shi, Ōsaka-fu 542-0075

4. Yakitori

Một loại đồ nhắm khá phổ biến tại những yatai (gánh hàng rong) hay izakaya (một dạng pub có phục vụ món ăn), yakitori là món thịt xiên nướng kiểu Nhật. Được thiết kế để mang đi, tất cả nguyên liệu được xiên lên một thanh tre (hay vật liệu tương tự) trước khi được nướng trên bếp than. Nguyên liệu chính thường là các loại thịt như bò, heo và gà (bao gồm cả da và các bộ phận khác của gà), cũng như các loại rau như nấm, hành tăm. Yakitori thường được ướp với muối, tiêu, wasabi và tare – một loại nước ướp chuyên dụng làm từ mirin, nước tương, sake và đường.

Yakitori
Yakitori – Skewered grilled meat
An izakaya
Izakaya – Japanese pub restaurant

Tips

Vì khá dễ làm, bạn có thể bắt gặp yakitori ở rất nhiều nơi. Nhưng nếu bạn đặc biệt thích yakitori thì không thể bỏ qua các yakitori-ya. Chúng là những quán nhỏ chuyên về các món nướng. Một ví dụ cho yakitoriya-ya chính là quán Kurashiki Takadaya, 11-36 本町 ở Kurashiki.

19 comments

  1. Thank you for sharing this, I didn’t know that there are Japanese “Wiener Schnitzel”! 😀
    It all looks very tasty.

    1. They are irresistible! 🙂 I must admit that I like the Japanese version of the Wiener Schnitzel more than the original one. The one in Europe is too large (at least for me), and it is sometimes over-dried.

      1. Yes, you’re right, the Wiener Schnitzel are often too big. I could imagine that the Japanese version tastes better.

  2. What a great blog post, Len! I love the idea that you want to do several parts to let your readers know more about authentic Japanese cuisine. I was only 13 when I visited Japan, so I have fond but hazy memories of Japan. One of the things I do remember was that there was ramen everywhere! It looked so simple, unlike our Nepali counterpart of noodles soup which is loaded with veggies and sometimes meat/egg, yet appetizing. And thank you so much for writing about Takoyaki! We were in Osaka and taken to a local restaurant and I remember those! I never realized those were takoyakis, but after reading your description it’s confirmed. I don’t think I have seen those here in local Japanese restaurants. Looking forward to part 2!

    1. Thanks a lot for your compliment, Pooja! 🙂
      It’s difficult to find takoyaki in Germany as well. It only appears on some rare occasions, such as the Spring Festival. I think the chefs in Europe don’t have the ingredients like fish-broth or fresh octopus. Or perhaps the Europeans don’t like it as much as sushi, so the Japanese don’t bring it to Europe 😛

  3. I’m glad I had a breakfast before reading this! I love Japanese curry, and in fact it is my favorite curry; in Indonesia the flavors of the curry even inspired the country’s largest noodle company to launch a curry-flavored instant noodle product decades ago which is still loved by many Indonesians up to this day. Looking forward to Part 2!

    1. Thank you, Bama! I hope I can finish part 2 this year, need to gather some material first 🙂 Curry-flavoured instant noodle? That’s is something new to me! Do they add the curry directly on the noodle, or there is an extra package of curry powder?

      1. The noodles come with three separate small packages of powdered condiment, chili powder, and oil-based curry sauce.

  4. We have some great Japanese restaurants here in Australia. It is one of my favorite cuisines. But I distinctly remember having soba noodles at a soba restaurant in Tokyo, which were just amazing. Great post of delicious Japanese specialties Len, now I’m in the mood for Yakitori!! 😉

    1. It was so delicious! Even now I can still remember how it tastes like 🙂 Luckily, we have some decent Japanese restaurants here in Saigon.

  5. This is simply a mouth-watering post, Len – I can almost taste the tonkatsu and takoyaki just by looking at your photos! Having grown up with pork as something of a culinary staple, I do miss it and crave it sometimes here in Jakarta (when I went to central Vietnam last April I binged and ate pork in almost every meal). It isn’t served in most places for religious reasons, but thankfully there’s a mall just across the road from my office with lots of decent Japanese restaurants that have it on the menu. And one of those places offers what may well be the best ramen in town. The rich flavor in the broth from the pork marrow bones and fat is just incredible!

    1. It sounds really great! It’s also interesting to know that you can have pork in Indonesia (limited though). In UAE, pork import is even prohibited. There might be some pork sausages in a buffet at a Western hotel, but they were put in a place that most people cannot see 🙂

  6. I love Japanese cuisine and ramen is my favourite dish, Len! This was an excellent guide for anyone who isn’t familiar with Japanise dishes. Your pictures made my mouth water!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.