Daibutsu in Nara

Nara: The Ancient Capital of Japan

Tiếng Việt

Overshadowed by its more famous neighbours, the city of Nara is usually omitted from the itinerary of many time-pressed travellers. But as Japan’s first permanent capital, Nara boasts many important scenic and historical sites. Thus, it’s definitively worth spending one or two days here to enjoy the atmosphere of ancient Japan.


To many visitors to Japan, Nara (奈良) is a mere day-trip destination less than one hour from Kyoto and Osaka. It’s widely known for the iconic temple of Todai-ji and the Nara Park where hundreds of sika deer freely roam. But more than 1300 years ago, this city was actually the first permanent capital of Japan.

A Brief History of Nara

Prior to the Nara Period, the seat of the Japanese government had been frequently moved from place to place. In fact, it was customary for the capital to be relocated with the beginning of each new reign. This practice changed when Empress Genmei established the imperial court in Heijō (currently Nara) in 708. Her successors also followed suit, and thus the city had become the capital of Japan for over 80 years.

During this period, Buddhism was declared as “guardian of the state” and actively promoted throughout Japan. Buddhist monks, therefore, became authoritative figures, gaining a lot respect and influence. Nevertheless, the political ambition of the Buddhist temples in Nara were so immense that it became a serious threat to the government. As a result, Emperor Kammu decided to move the capital to Nagaoka in 784, and a few years later to Kyoto in order to lower the temple’s influence on state affairs.

Although its heyday is long gone, Nara is still able to retain its ancient atmosphere. Many of its historic treasures remain in good condition, including artefacts dating back to the Nara period, as well as some of Japan’s oldest and largest buildings. They are mostly located in Nara Park (奈良公園) – an expansive green area in the centre of the city.

1. Todai-ji

Presiding over the vast Nara Park, Tōdai-ji (東大寺) is the city’s most recognisable architecture and one of Japan’s most famous temples. It was constructed in 752 as the central administration for all six provincial temples of different Buddhist schools in Japan at that time. Extending over 2850 m², the current temple’s main hall was one of the world’s largest wooden structure. However, the hall is still 30% smaller than its original version which was unfortunately destroyed by fire.

Chumon Gate at Tōdai-ji
Chumon Gate at Tōdai-ji
The iconic Tōdai-ji Temple in Nara
The iconic Tōdai-ji Temple in Nara

Positioned at the centre of the temple is the Daibutsu – a 16-metre high, gilt bronze statue of Vairocana. It was the centrepiece of various rituals, such as prayers for the peace of the nation, protection against epidemics, bountiful crops, as well as worldly prosperity. Either side of the statue are flanked by two seated Bodhisattvas, and there are Four Heavenly Kings standing at the corners of the main hall. The Buddha was also identified with the Sun Goddess, reflecting a syncretism of Buddhism and Shinto.

Daibutsu in Nara
Daibutsu – The world’s largest bronze statue
One of the Four Heavenly Kings
One of the Four Heavenly Kings

2. Kasuga Taisha

Characterised by a sloping roof extending over the front of the main building, Kasuga Taisha (春日大社) is Nara’s most celebrated Shinto shrine. It’s dedicated to the four guardian deities of Japan and consists of multiple buildings. The shrine is located in the southern part of Nara Park and was established at the same time as the capital.

As the tutelary shrine of the Fujiwara – Japan’s most powerful clan during most of the Nara and Heian periods, Kasuga Taisha was therefore an object of imperial patronage. That’s why it was rebuilt several times over centuries, similar to the Ise Shrines in Mie. In the case of Kasuga Taisha, however, this custom discontinued at the end of the Meiji Period.

Distinctive architectural style of Kasuga Taisha in Nara
Distinctive architectural style of Kasuga Taisha

The Lanterns of Kasuga Taisha

Kasuga Taisha is also famous for its lanterns, which have been donated by worshippers to express their gratitude and support to the shrine. There are 3000 stone lanterns lining the path that leads up to the shrine. They symbolise the guiding light of Shinto. And the number 3000 represents the 3000 branches of Kasuga shrine spreading throughout Japan.

Adding to that is hundreds of bronze lanterns hanging inside the inner buildings. These lanterns are only lit twice a year during two Lantern Festivals: one in early-February and one in mid-August. But visitors to Kasuga Taisha can still see some lit-up lanterns inside a small room at the back of the temple.

The stone lanterns of Kasuga Taisha
The stone lanterns of Kasuga Taisha
The bronze lanterns of Kasuga Taisha
The bronze lanterns dangle from the temple buildings
Lit-up lanterns
Lit-up lanterns
The lanterns of Kasuga Taisha
The lanterns of Kasuga Taisha

3. The Nara Deer

When speaking of Nara, the image of freely roaming deer might come up in many people’s mind. Worshipped as the messengers of the Shinto kami, the deer has long been an unseparated part of Nara. The city hosts more than 1200 sika deer which often gathered in and around Nara Park. Visitors can encounter them virtually everywhere, from the ground of the Tōdai-ji, the Wakayama hills to the lantern-lined entrance of the Kasuga Taisha. Even the receptionist at our ryokan jokingly recommended that: “Follow the deer and you will be able to see all of Nara’s main attraction.”

Nara's deer - The messengers of the Shinto gods
Nara’s deer – The messengers of the Shinto gods
Wakayama hill
Wakayama hill – A favourite spot of the deer. It’s also a perfect place to have a panoramic view of Nara. But beware of deer poop!

Similar to the deer in Miyajima, Nara’s deer have become accustomed to human. That’s why they are generally tame. However, some might turn aggressive if they think you will feed them. Some are wiser and have learned to bow to visitors to ask to be fed. And good behaviour usually brings more reward. The deer’s favourite snack is crackers that are sold for 150¥ per pack.

Breakfast time at Nara Park
It’s breakfast time!

Practical Information

  • Nara is easily accessible by trains from both Kyoto and Osaka. It takes less than one hour and you can choose either the Japan Railways (JR) or Kintetsu Railways.
  • The advantage of taking JR train is that the fare is covered by JR Pass. But a trip with Kintetsu will take less time and the station is much closer to Nara Park than JR station.
Advertisements

Nara: Kinh đô đầu tiên của Nhật Bản

Không được biết đến nhiều như Osaka hay Kyoto, Nara (奈良) dường như hiếm khi nằm trong lịch trình của nhiều du khách. Nó thường chỉ được biết đến như một địa điểm tham quan trong ngày, và du khách thường không qua đêm tại đây. Tuy nhiên, nếu bạn nán lại đây một hoặc hai ngày, bạn sẽ thấy rằng Nara rất thú vị và giàu giá trị lịch sử.

Sơ lược về cố đô Nara

Khoảng 1300 năm trước, Nara – được gọi là Heijō lúc bấy giờ – đã từng là kinh đô đầu tiên của Nhật Bản. Trước đó, nước Nhật hoàn toàn không có một kinh đô nhất định. Cứ mỗi khi một triều đại mới bắt đầu, kinh đô lại được dời đến một chỗ khác. Tuy nhiên, phong tục này đã thay đổi khi Nữ vương Genmei thiết lập triều đình tại Heijō vào năm 708. Những người kế vị của bà cũng đã quyết định không dời đô. Chính vì thế, Heijō đã trở thành kinh đô của Nhật Bản trong suốt gần một thế kỉ.

Vào thời điểm đó, Phật Giáo đang rất phát triển tại Nhật Bản. Thậm chí, đạo Phật còn được công nhận là quốc giáo trong suốt thời kì Nara. Vì thế mà sức ảnh hưởng và quyền lực của tăng lữ cũng trở nên lớn mạnh. Đến gần cuối thời kì Nara, quyền lực và tham vọng của các ngôi chùa đã trở nên quá lớn, khiến triều đình hoang mang. Vì thế hoàng gia đã quyết định dời đô về Nagaoka vào năm 784. Sau đó kinh đô được dời hẳn về Kyoto, nhằm hạn chế tầm ảnh hưởng của các tăng lữ.

Mặc dù thời kì hoàng kim của Nara đã đi qua, nét đẹp cổ kính của một cố đô vẫn còn đó. Nhiều cổ vật từ thời Nara, cũng như những kiến trúc độc đáo đều được bảo tồn gần như nguyên vẹn. Phần lớn các điểm tham quan đều nằm trong công viên Nara – một khôn gian xanh nằm ngay trung tâm thành phố.

1. Todai-ji

Sừng sững như một ngọn núi ở khu vực phía Bắc công viên Nara, Tōdai-ji (東大寺) là kiến trúc biểu tượng của thành phố. Đây cũng là một trong những ngôi chùa nổi tiếng nhất Nhật Bản được xây dựng vào năm 752. Tōdai-ji là trung tâm hành chính của sáu môn phái Phật giáo đang thịnh hành lúc bấy giờ tại Nara. Tōdai-ji sở hữu một đại điện rộng 2850m² và được xây hoàn toàn bằng gỗ. Cho đến năm 1998, đại điện này đã được đánh giá là kiến trúc bằng gỗ lớn nhất thế giới. Tuy nhiên, kiến trúc hiện tại chỉ là phiên bản xây dựng lại vào thế kỉ 17. Nó vẫn nhỏ hơn khoảng 30% so với kích cỡ ban đầu của đại điện.

Chumon Gate at Tōdai-ji
Chumon Gate at Tōdai-ji
The iconic Tōdai-ji Temple in Nara
The iconic Tōdai-ji Temple in Nara

Đặt chính giữa đại điện là Daibutsu – bức tượng Phật bằng đồng lớn nhất thế giới. Cao gần 16m, tượng là tâm điểm của những buổi lễ cầu an, cầu phúc cho quốc gia trong thời kì Nara. Hai bên tượng là hai bức tượng Bồ Tát được mạ vàng, và bốn góc của đại điện có Tứ Đại Thiên Vương trấn giữ. Daibutsu được ví ngang với nữ thần mặt trời Amaterasu – vị thần tối cao của đạo Shinto, thể hiện sự hòa hợp giữa hai tôn giáo.

Daibutsu
Daibutsu – The world’s largest bronze statue
One of the Four Heavenly Kings
One of the Four Heavenly Kings

2. Kasuga Taisha

Dễ dàng nhận ra bởi kiến trúc độc đáo, Kasuga Taisha (春日大社) là ngôi đền Shinto nổi tiếng nhất Nara. Kasuga Taisha là đền thờ bốn vị thần bảo hộ của Nhật Bản. Nó bao gồm một đền chính và một số đền phụ. Đền nằm ở khu vực phía Nam của công viên Nara và được xây từ ngày thành phố được chọn làm kinh đô.

Kasuga Taisha là ngôi đền bảo hộ của nhà Fujiwara, dòng họ quyền lực nhất Nhật Bản trong suốt hai thời kì Nara và Edo. Vì thế mà ngôi đền này dành được rất nhiều sự quan tâm của hoàng gia. Cũng như ngôi đền Ise thiêng liêng ở tỉnh Mie, đền Kasuga cũng được xây mới lại mỗi 20 năm. Tuy nhiên tục lệ này chấm dứt vào thời kì Meiji khi mà chế độ lãnh chúa sụp đổ.

Distinctive architectural style
Distinctive architectural style of Kasuga Taisha

Những chiếc đèn ở Kasuga Taisha

Người ta còn biết đến Kasuga Taisha nhờ vào những chiếc đèn lồng. Có khoảng vài trăm chiếc đèn lồng bằng đồng được treo trong đền. Và 3000 chiếc đèn bằng đá được xếp dọc theo lối vào đền. Tất cả đều được người dân hiến tặng nhằm thể hiện sự biết ơn và sự ủng hộ của họ đối với đền Kasuga Taisha.

Trong đạo Shinto, những chiếc đèn lồng là hiện thân cho ánh sáng của các vị thần nhằm dẫn dắt những người theo đạo. Còn con số 3000 là biểu tượng cho số đền Kasuga ở khắp Nhật Bản. Những chiếc đèn này chỉ được thắp sáng vào hai dịp lễ trong năm vào đầu tháng 2 và giữa tháng 8. Tuy nhiên, bạn vẫn có thể thấy những chiếc đèn được thắp sáng lung linh trong một căn phòng nhỏ, nằm sâu bên trong đền.

The stone lanterns of Kasuga Taisha
The stone lanterns of Kasuga Taisha
The bronze lanterns
The bronze lanterns dangle from the temple buildings
Lit-up lanterns
Lit-up lanterns
The lanterns of Kasuga Taisha
The lanterns of Kasuga Taisha

3. Nai Nara

Khi nói đến Nara, nhiều du khách nghĩ ngay đến hình ảnh của những chú nai đốm đi lại tự do trong thành phố. Được xem như là những người đưa tin của các vị thần, những con nai này là một phần không thể thiếu của Nara. Có khoảng hơn 1200 con nai sinh sống ở Nara và chúng thường tập trung trong và xung quanh công viên. Khi đến Nara, bạn dường như có thể bắt gặp chúng ở khắp mọi nơi, từ khuôn viên của chùa Tōdai-ji, đồi Wakayama đến lối vào đền Kasuga.

Nara's deer
Nara’s deer – The messengers of the Shinto gods
Wakayama hill
Wakayama hill – A favourite spot of the deer. It’s also a perfect place to have a panoramic view of Nara. But beware of deer poop!

Cũng như những chú nai ở Miyajima, nai Nara đã quá quen với con người. Nhìn chung thì chúng khá ngoan. Tuy nhiên, một số có thể trở nên hung hãn khi chúng nghĩ bạn sẽ cho chúng ăn. Một vài con đã học cách cúi chào để xin thức ăn của du khách. Đồ ăn ưa thích của chúng là những miếng bánh cho nai được bày bán với giá 150¥/ một xấp 10 cái.

Breakfast time at Nara Park
It’s breakfast time!

Một số thông tin cần biết

  • Nara chỉ nằm cách Osaka và Kyoto khoảng 30-40 phút. Có hai công ty tàu lửa mà bạn có thể chọn là JR hoặc Kintetsu.
  • Điểm tiện lợi của JR là giá vé được bao gồm trong JR Pass. Tuy nhiên, tàu chạy chậm hơn tàu Kintetsu. Đồng thời, ga JR cũng nằm xa công viên Nara hơn ga Kintetsu.
Advertisements

25 Comments

    1. Len Kagami

      Thank you, Don! 🙂 When I first published this blog, I chose English as my primary language. But then my mom asked whether I could write it in Vietnamese as well, because she and her friend want to read it. As baby boomers, they speak very little English, and Google Translate is so unreliable (at least in the translation of Vietnamese) 🙂

  1. Bama

    Just last week I finished writing my own post on Nara, but unlike the day when you went there, it happened to be cloudy when I visited Nara. It was a very nice day trip from Kyoto, and despite the grey skies Todai-ji was still an impressive sight.

    1. Len Kagami

      It’s huge, isn’t it? I have seen many Buddha statues, but this one is surely one-of-a-kind 🙂 I was also impressed by how vast the park is. If you don’t know, you can easily mistake it as a forest, especially in the early morning or late at night.

  2. AthenaCreativeWeb

    Hi Len thanks for these articles my bf and I will be visiting Japan soon and will surely check out this recommendation of yours. I love your photos and style of writing too very engaging

    1. Len Kagami

      Thank you for your very kind words! I am glad that my post can help you plan your trip. If you have any further question, feel free to ask 🙂

    1. Len Kagami

      Thank you! What do you like most about Nara? My favourite was the deer. Some are pretty bold, while a few are really tamed. Can’t resist giving them crackers 😀

      1. Forestwood

        Well, we knew to bow to them – so as they would bow to us! ( before giving them the crackers). We had some great fun – some chased us around. It was all about the deer and the beautiful shrines at Nara. Fantastic place.

  3. Bà Tám

    Len sống ở VN hay nước ngoài? Nước nào? Học tiếng Anh từ bao giờ? Học ở đâu? Học tiếng Việt được bao nhiêu năm? Len viết tiếng Anh và tiếng Việt đều hay.

    1. Len Kagami

      Dạ cám ơn cô 😀 Cháu về Sài Gòn được khoảng 2 năm rồi ạ. Trước đó thì ở Đức, nhưng thuộc dạng du học sinh thôi ạ. Từ hồi cấp 1 cháu đã học tiếng Anh rồi nên đọc và viết ok. Nhưng nói thì hay bị pha tiếng Đức. Kiểu viết sao thì phát âm vậy 🙂

Leave a Reply